Pocket Full of Rain – Exclusive Preview

{product_snapshot:id=1484,true,false,true,left} An Anthology of Materful Shorts from the Creator of I Killed Adolf Hitler This multifaceted anthology collects over 25 stories from the first decade of Jason’s career, including his remarkable calling card, the novella-length thriller “Pocket Full of Rain,” which has never before been published in English. Like a number of his initial stories, “Pocket” is actually drawn with realistic human beings instead of blank-faced animal characters — a true revelation for Jason fans. In fact, this book showcases three distinct styles: his earliest “realistic” drawing style (used to unsettling effect in some particularly creepy stories), an intermediate “bighead”…

Strange and Stranger: The World of Steve Ditko – Exclusive Preview

{product_snapshot:id=1474,true,false,true,left} The First Critical Retrospective of the Work of the Reclusive Spider-Man Co-Creator Steve Ditko is best known as the co-creator, with Stan Lee, of Spider-Man, Dr. Strange, and other classic Marvel and DC characters. But, in the context of Steve Ditko’s 50-year career in comics, his creative involvement with Spider-Man is merely the tip of the iceberg. Strange and Stranger: The World of Steve Ditko is a coffee table art book tracing Ditko’s life and career, his unparalleled stylistic innovations, and his strict adherence to his philosophical principles, with lush displays of obscure and popular art from the thousands…

The Number 73304-23-4153-6-96-8 – Exclusive Preview

Swiss Horror Master Thomas Ott Returns with His First Full-Length Graphic Novel {product_snapshot:id=1418,true,false,true,left}When clearing up the cell of a prisoner who has been sentenced to death and subsequently executed, a prison guard finds a small piece of paper with a combination of numbers on it. On the spur of the moment, he puts it into his pocket. As the guard lives a solitary, monotonous life, the numbers on the paper awake his curiosity. To find out their hidden meaning could add a new meaning to his life as well, so the guard stumbles into situations in which the number or…

Mome Vol. 11: Summer 2008 – Exclusive Preview

Another Humdinger of a Volume of Our Cutting-Edge Comix Anthology {product_snapshot:id=1459,true,false,true,left}Vol. 11 of our acclaimed anthology series welcomes Killoffer, the acclaimed French cartoonist whose work has previously only been seen in the acclaimed collection 176 Apparitions of Killoffer. Killoffer delivers a new 12-page comic as well as front and back covers. Mome also features returning regulars Al Columbia, Kurt Wolfgang, Ray Fenwick, Eleanor Davis, Dash Shaw, John Hankiewicz, Émile Bravo, Andrice Arp, Tom Kaczynski, and Paul Hornschemeier. Plus, newcomers Conor O’Keefe and Nate Neal, as well as an interview with Ray Fenwick by Gary Groth. Download an EXCLUSIVE 15-page PDF…

The Production Evolution of a Humbug Page

{product_snapshot:id=1501,true,false,true,left} Fantagraphics’ Humbug collection is due in early 2009. This two-volume slipcased hardcover set assembles the never-before-collected, complete, original 11-issue run (1957-58) of the satirical magazine conceived and edited by Harvey Kurtzman and created by Kurtzman, Jack Davis, Will Elder, Al Jaffee (Kurtzman’s MAD magazine cohorts one and all) and Arnold Roth. This feature, conceived by Fantagraphics publisher Gary Groth and written by our production ace Paul Baresh, will give you a behind-the-scenes glimpse into the restoration of a Humbug page. – Ed. This is the original artwork. You can see all the items are pasted on and there are…

Interview – Hate Q&A with Peter Bagge (1997)

This interview was originally conducted circa 1997, and annotated in February 2008. Q: Why did you kill Stinky? A: Everybody has asked for me to bring Stinky back to the fold, but when I would think about it I couldn’t see Buddy allowing Stinky to be a part of his life again. Buddy’s an evolving character, while Stinky is one of those people who never changes, and it just didn’t make sense that Buddy would hang out with Stinky anymore. I had this story that began in Hate #26 where basically all of Buddy’s loser guy friends are brought together…

MOME Interview 4: Jonathan Bennett

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 4. It was practically inevitable that Jonathan Bennett would become a cartoonist: Growing up in Syosset, a suburb on Long Island, he was a comics geek at an early age, reading newspaper strips first (Peanuts, Calvin and Hobbes, Ziggy), then graduating, if that is the word, to shitty Marvel comics at the age of eight or nine. I use the word ‘shitty’ advisedly since Jonathan admitted to loving Marvel’s Secret Wars II series, one of the most incontestably awful comics series ever conceived. But apparently nothing could stop the young…

MOME Interview 3: Kurt Wolfgang

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 3. Kurt Wolfgang, the old man of MOME, was a late bloomer, which may be why he’s the old man of MOME. He always drew and always drew comics, but he never read comic books as a kid, much less obsessed over them. He read a handful of newspaper strips, but as he sagely put it, most of the strips in the ’70s were “crappy,” so he didn’t read many of them — though he did manage to take one of Joe Kubert’s ancillary weekend comics courses when he was…

MOME Interview 2: Gabrielle Bell

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 2. {mosimage}Gabrielle Bell was born in London, England in 1976, but was raised in Mendocino County, California, with three siblings. Many cartoonists, especially of the alternative stripe, relate a stereotyped childhood of alienation and anomie; Gabrielle had a leg up on most of them: She was raised in an isolated, bohemian mountain enclave. Her parents grew and sold pot for a living, as did many of her friends’ parents. It probably didn’t help that the community was split between pot entrepreneurs and rednecks who worked at the local wood mill….

MOME Interview 1: Paul Hornschemeier

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 1. My first exposure to Paul Hornschemeier‘s work was Mother, Come Home, which I read sometime in late 2003. It impressed me enough to start the gears churning, and I remember thinking that the three-issue comics series would make a good graphic novel; I made a mental note to contact this Hornschemeier fellow and inquire about the possibility of collecting it. I didn’t know that copies of the collected graphic novel were en route to America from an Asian printer and would be in stores within weeks. But at least…