Terr’ble Thompson – The Musical and Rarities

{mosimage} It was early 1955. The New York record producer, Arthur Shimkin, for whom I’d done a couple of animated musical shorts when I was directing the UPA/New York animation studio, heard of my developing newspaper strip and asked me to come up with a script for a musical production of it for a Simon & Shuster “Little Golden Record,” one of those little 6-inch yellow plastic discs made for kiddie record players. Not a big deal, yet Shimkin brought in truly top talent for the date. He got the pop American composer Alec Wilder, and Broadway lyricist Marshall Barer…

Artist Bio – Jim Woodring

{mosimage}Jim Woodring’s cartoons chart a course through some of the most surreal imagery ever seen in any artistic medium, drawing visions from the realms of the subconscious to create a graphic world of dreams. But while his work may speak in the language of dreams, Woodring’s life has often led him into nightmare territory. As a child, Woodring was plagued by both schoolmates and by waking nightmares accompanied by “voices” — a condition which would haunt him through childhood and much of his adult life. After enduring drug and alcohol abuse and homelessness, he worked as an animator for several…

Artist Bio – Robert Williams

In the late 20th and 21st century diverse forms of commonplace and popular art appeared to be coalescing into a formidable faction of new painted realism. The phenomenon owed its genesis to a number of factors. The new school of imagery was a product of art that didn’t fit comfortable into the accepted definition of fine art. It embraced some of the figurative graphics that formal art academia tended to reject: comic books, movie posters, trading cards, surfer art, hot rod illustration, to mention a few. This alternative art movement found its most congealing participant in one of America’s most…

Artist Bio – Lewis Trondheim

{mosimage}Lewis Trondheim was born in 1964 and spent his childhood in the french town of Fontainebleau. In 1987 he met Jean-Christophe Menu, an aspiring cartoonist who turned him on to the world of comics. In 1990, together with four other cartoonists, Menu and Trondheim co-founded L’Association, a publishing company which would go on to publish some of the most revolutionary alternative European comics of the decade. Trondheim has appropriated the classic funny-animal tradition of cartoonists like Carl Barks, Walt Kelly, and Stan Sakai and given it a fresh contemporary spin with his “McConey” stories. The dialogue is consistently witty, and…

Artist Bio – Carol Swain

{mosimage}Born in 1962, London, Carol Swain was brought up in Wales, the population of the village being an uneasy mix of mean Baptist hysteric (© Hunter S Thompson) and drop-out hippie. A place deemed so evil by travelling evangelist missionaries, they condemned it as a modern Sodom and Gomorrah. She left Sodom and Gomorrah to go to art school where she studied painting. In 1989 she began self-publishing her comic Way Out Strips, which was later picked up by Fantagraphics Books. Since then she has completed two graphic novels and has contributed numerous comics stories to anthologies worldwide. She lives…

Artist Bio – Roger Langridge

{mosimage}Roger Langridge was born in New Zealand in 1967. He decided to become a cartoonist when he was six years old; for some reason it stuck (perhaps because it was more attainable than his previous career goal of “mad scientist”). Since 1990, when he moved to London to pursue his career, Roger Langridge has worked for most of the major comic publishers in the English-speaking world, as well as sustaining a parallel career as an illustrator. His self-published title “Fred the Clown” (collected into one volume by Fantagraphics in 2004) has been nominated for Eisner, Harvey, Ignatz and Reuben Awards….

Artist Bio – Kaz

{mosimage}Kaz was born in Hoboken, New Jersey in 1959. During the 1980s he studied comics under Art Spiegelman and contributed to the early issues of Raw magazine, eventually releasing his first anthology collection, the oversized (and now out of print and highly sought-after) Buzzbomb, with Fantagraphics Books. In 1991 he started the weekly self-syndicated comic strip: Underworld. Fantagraphics began collecting Underworld into book form in April of 1995, with five collections released to date. Sidetrack City and other Tales, a collection of longer comic strips, was published by Fantagraphics in 1996. The Underworld comic strip has been nominated for a…

Artist Bio – Jason

{mosimage}The Norwegian cartoonist Jason combines a poker-faced minimalist anthropomorphic style with more than a passing nod to the “clear-line” ethos of Hergé. As he has shown in a series of acclaimed graphic novels, this seemingly limited approach has proven amazingly versatile, allowing Jason to create gag comedy (Meow, Baby!), romantic melodramas (Tell Me Something), dramas (Hey, Wait…), and genuine thrillers (the period detective novel The Iron Wagon) — often without even the benefit of words, and using a stylishly minimalist color palette to boot. Jason won the Norwegian “Sproing” Award for “Best Norwegian Comic Book” twice, in 1995 and 2000….

Artist Bio – Bill Griffith

{mosimage}Bill Griffith grew up in Levittown, New York. He attended Pratt Institute and studied painting and graphic arts concurrently with Kim Deitch — they dropped out about the same time. Inspired by Zap, Griffith began making underground comics in 1969, and joined the cartoonists in San Francisco in 1970. Griffith’s famous character Zippy the Pinhead made his initial appearances in early underground comic books, morphing into a syndicated weekly strip in 1976 and then a nationally-syndicated daily strip a decade later. Griffith is married to cartoonist and editor Diane Noomin. They live in Connecticut. “In two decades, Bill Griffith’s Zippy…

Artist Bio – Kim Deitch

{mosimage}Kim Deitch has a reserved place at the first table of underground cartoonists. The son of UPA and Terrytoons animator Gene Deitch, Kim was born in 1944 and grew up around the animation business. He began doing comic strips for the East Village Other in 1967, introducing two of his more famous characters, Waldo the Cat and Uncle Ed, the India Rubber Man. In 1969 he succeeded Vaughn Bodé as editor of Gothic Blimp Works, the Other’s underground comics tabloid. During this period he married fellow cartoonist Trina Robbins and had a daughter, Casey. “The Mishkin Saga” was named one…