MOME Interview 4: Jonathan Bennett

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 4. It was practically inevitable that Jonathan Bennett would become a cartoonist: Growing up in Syosset, a suburb on Long Island, he was a comics geek at an early age, reading newspaper strips first (Peanuts, Calvin and Hobbes, Ziggy), then graduating, if that is the word, to shitty Marvel comics at the age of eight or nine. I use the word ‘shitty’ advisedly since Jonathan admitted to loving Marvel’s Secret Wars II series, one of the most incontestably awful comics series ever conceived. But apparently nothing could stop the young…

MOME Interview 3: Kurt Wolfgang

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 3. Kurt Wolfgang, the old man of MOME, was a late bloomer, which may be why he’s the old man of MOME. He always drew and always drew comics, but he never read comic books as a kid, much less obsessed over them. He read a handful of newspaper strips, but as he sagely put it, most of the strips in the ’70s were “crappy,” so he didn’t read many of them — though he did manage to take one of Joe Kubert’s ancillary weekend comics courses when he was…

MOME Interview 2: Gabrielle Bell

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 2. {mosimage}Gabrielle Bell was born in London, England in 1976, but was raised in Mendocino County, California, with three siblings. Many cartoonists, especially of the alternative stripe, relate a stereotyped childhood of alienation and anomie; Gabrielle had a leg up on most of them: She was raised in an isolated, bohemian mountain enclave. Her parents grew and sold pot for a living, as did many of her friends’ parents. It probably didn’t help that the community was split between pot entrepreneurs and rednecks who worked at the local wood mill….

MOME Interview 1: Paul Hornschemeier

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 1. My first exposure to Paul Hornschemeier‘s work was Mother, Come Home, which I read sometime in late 2003. It impressed me enough to start the gears churning, and I remember thinking that the three-issue comics series would make a good graphic novel; I made a mental note to contact this Hornschemeier fellow and inquire about the possibility of collecting it. I didn’t know that copies of the collected graphic novel were en route to America from an Asian printer and would be in stores within weeks. But at least…