Artist Bio – Peter Bagge

{mosimage} By common consensus, Peter Bagge is the funniest cartoonist of his generation, and is probably best known for the ’90s comic book series Hate, which followed the exploits of the slacker ne’er-do-well Buddy Bradley (and managed to show probably the truest representation of Seattle during the “grunge” boom and bust). Peter Bagge was born in Peekskill, New York. He studied briefly at the School of Visual Arts in New York City in the mid-’70s. Upon exposure to the work of underground comics, particularly the work of R. Crumb, Bagge plunged into cartooning with a vengeance. In the early ’80s…

Artist Bio – Linda Medley

{mosimage} Linda Medley is the author of the acclaimed Castle Waiting graphic novel, published by Fantagraphics Books. A freelance illustrator since 1985, Linda Medley has illustrated children’s books for Putnam, Grosset & Dunlap, Houghton-Mifflin, and Western Publishing. Linda has worked in the comics industry as a penciller, inker, painter, colorist and sculptor. Her pencilling work includes stints on both Justice League and Doom Patrol for DC, as well as the Galactic Girl Guides for Tundra. Her paintings have appeared on the covers of Paradox Press’ Family Man, Stuck Rubber Baby and TSR’s Dragon magazine to name just a few. Born…

Artist Bio – Charles Burns

{mosimage}Born in Washington D. C., Burns was only a young tyke when he moved with his family to Seattle in 1965 (not so coincidentally the eventual locale of his semi-autobiographical magnum opus, Black Hole). Burns’ childhood was steeped in Mad magazine, Roger Corman horror flicks and the television culture of that time. After attending high school in the mid-’70s and discovering underground comics artists such as R. Crumb, Burns went to Evergreen College, where he would meet such soon-to-be famous cartoonists as Matt Groening and Lynda Barry. He subsequently attended graduate school at the University of California, Davis. It was…

Interview – Los Bros. Hernandez (1988)

Originally published in The Comics Journal #126, 1988 {mosimage}Mario, Gilbert, and Jaime Hernandez were born and raised in Oxnard, California, just north of Los Angeles. They grew up reading comic books, watching monster movies, listening to rock and roll music, and, most significantly, drawing their own cartoons and comics. In the late ’70s they became heavily involved in punk rock, and this phenomenon opened their eyes to the possibilities of expressing themselves in comics. It was Mario who put these ambitions on a practical footing, enlisting his brothers in a self-published comic called Love & Rockets. They sent a review…

Announcing The Drinky Crow Show!

{mosimage} THE DRINKY CROW SHOW PREMIERES MAY 13! TONY MILLIONAIRE’S “MAAKIES” COMES TO ADULT SWIM On Sunday, May 13, 2007, The Cartoon Network’s popular Adult Swim animation showcase will premiere the long-awaited pilot of The Drinky Crow Show, based on cartoonist Tony Millionaire’s long-running Maakies comic strip. The show’s comedy is brutal, existential, and hilarious. As with animated shows like The Simpsons or Futurama, The Drinky Crow Show is a fast-paced, plot-twisting laff-riot combining adventure, romance, debauchery and graphic violence — offering something for everybody! The 11-minute pilot, titled “Mermaid,” finds Drinky Crow encountering a mermaid following a broken-hearted suicide…

MOME Interview 6: Tim Hensley

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 6. Tim Hensley was born in 1966 in Bloomington, Indiana. Besides a familiarity with his comics, this is everything I knew about him before I spoke to him on September 2. He filled in the details: He moved to LA (where he still lives) at age 3. His father was a successful musician who had a psychedelic rock band in Indiana called Masters of Deceit. In LA he did session work for such unpromising acts as Pia Zadora and Pink Lady, but went on to become Neil Diamond’s piano player…

MOME Interview 5: Andrice Arp

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 5. Andrice Arp was born in 1969 in Altadena, California, where she grew up in the ’70s and ’80s. Her mother was an artist — a sculptor, performance artist and, most recently, a novelist — and probably influenced her future vocation. Her father is an astronomer, whose profession apparently did not influence her quite as much. She was by no means a comics geek. She remembers reading beautiful childen’s books when she was a little girl, as well as the work of Edward Gorey, Charles Addams, B. Kliban, and Tove…

MOME Interview 4: Jonathan Bennett

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 4. It was practically inevitable that Jonathan Bennett would become a cartoonist: Growing up in Syosset, a suburb on Long Island, he was a comics geek at an early age, reading newspaper strips first (Peanuts, Calvin and Hobbes, Ziggy), then graduating, if that is the word, to shitty Marvel comics at the age of eight or nine. I use the word ‘shitty’ advisedly since Jonathan admitted to loving Marvel’s Secret Wars II series, one of the most incontestably awful comics series ever conceived. But apparently nothing could stop the young…

MOME Interview 3: Kurt Wolfgang

This interview is reprinted in its entirety from MOME Vol. 3. Kurt Wolfgang, the old man of MOME, was a late bloomer, which may be why he’s the old man of MOME. He always drew and always drew comics, but he never read comic books as a kid, much less obsessed over them. He read a handful of newspaper strips, but as he sagely put it, most of the strips in the ’70s were “crappy,” so he didn’t read many of them — though he did manage to take one of Joe Kubert’s ancillary weekend comics courses when he was…